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Environmental Factor

Environmental Factor

Your Online Source for NIEHS News

October 2016

NIEHS clinical researcher receives Research and Hope Award

NIEHS researcher Lisa Rider, M.D., received the 2016 Research & Hope Award from PhRMA, for her work on juvenile myositis.

Lisa Rider, M.D., deputy unit chief of the NIEHS Environmental Autoimmunity Group, received the 2016 Research and Hope Award for Excellence in Government Research from the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America (PhRMA), which represents biopharmaceutical research companies in the United States. The group selected Rider for her work with juvenile myositis (JM), a disease characterized by muscle weakness and skin rash. Rider accepted the award at a ceremony Sept. 13 in Washington, D.C.

In addition to her tireless research efforts, Rider has spent years working with the JM community. She was involved in developing new measures that assess the disease in adults and young people, creating a JM registry in the U.S., and partnering with the Cure JM Foundation to improve the outcome of children with myositis.

When asked about her selection for the award, Rider said she was extremely honored and happy that the public would learn more about JM. "I hope my research will lead to a cure for the approximately 5,000 young people that have the disease," Rider said.

NIEHS Clinical Director Janet Hall, M.D., said the award was a testament to the excellence of Rider’s skills as a physician and investigator, and her dedication to the JM community.

"Not only does Lisa care about her own patients, but she has become an international leader in the fight to find cures for this extremely disabling disease," Hall said.


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